Tuesday, June 26, 2012


White Paper

www.mattchurch.com/salesevolutiondetailsThis month's White Paper is A Sales Evolution! The fundamental shift in selling that has occurred and how it has completely changed how you drive business.

The internet has redistributed knowledge power. An expert used to be the person who held the answers but with google, wikipedia and other platforms it's getting easier to become informed about almost anything. This has caused major disruptions for many industries. From education to medicine, from retail to automobiles, a buyer is now able to get informed fast and stay informed on demand. This is driving an evolution in the selling process and it’s one that business needs to be tracking.

From features and benefits, to insights and opinions, Matt Church and Peter Cook have it covered in this White Paper.
Download your complimentary copy of the A Sales Evolution! today. We only ask that you please complete a few brief questions prior to downloading.

Enjoy!

M@

Tuesday, June 19, 2012

Instead of selling, try clicking

For a Thought leader to be commercially smart, someone, somewhere, must buy their great ideas. That’s the secret by the way; stop selling and start letting people buy. For this to happen you don’t need to figure out some slick sales script, you don’t need to handle their objections, you don't need to learn the six magic steps of influence. What you need to do is know your stuff, know their needs and place you and your ideas into the conversation, so that they click. This is the same whether you are talking about people outside your organisation or Thought Leaders practice or to your staff internally. Whether you are talking to a large crowd or one-to-one, you need to make it easier for them to want to listen to your ideas.
There have been some attempts to evolve traditional selling such as integrity sales or relationship selling. While they have their merits, tried and tested sales techniques are increasingly experienced by our customers as tired and broken. Thought leaders need to do something different to take the relationship to the next level. It’s our belief that clicking is the next stage for selling to evolve to. We believe clicking is the key to selling ideas in the crowded, post information age, always on, attention deficit economy.

Here is a process you can try:
Thought leaders don’t sell, they understand. If you don't know why people might benefit from your ideas, then spend time getting to know them and ask their permission to use them as a pilot to test and prototype your offer. Initially they may not even pay you, but if it works they will tell all their contacts and mates about you. If it doesn’t, then what you will learn from this experience will be invaluable. This is thought prototyping though. Once you know their needs and can show them how you have a solution, then they invite you to dance! It’s really simple. All you need to do is:
  • Know your stuff
  • Know my stuff
  • Place your stuff as the solution to my stuff and always create massive value.
The idea that you have integrity is the price of entry. Without this, others will not buy your ideas, your approach, or you. As a consequence, thought leaders embrace this new approach, because they can evolve from selling to people, to clicking with people. Clicking is simple fun of service to the people you are communicating with and earns you the right to pitch your ideas and approach.

For a Thought leader to be commercially smart, someone, somewhere, must buy their great ideas. That’s the secret by the way; stop selling and start letting people buy. For this to happen you don’t need to figure out some slick sales script, you don’t need to handle their objections, you don't need to learn the six magic steps of influence. What you need to do is know your stuff, know their needs and place you and your ideas into the conversation, so that they click. This is the same whether you are talking about people outside your organisation or Thought Leaders practice or to your staff internally. Whether you are talking to a large crowd or one-to-one, you need to make it easier for them to want to listen to your ideas.
There have been some attempts to evolve traditional selling such as integrity sales or relationship selling. While they have their merits, tried and tested sales techniques are increasingly experienced by our customers as tired and broken. Thought leaders need to do something different to take the relationship to the next level. It’s our belief that clicking is the next stage for selling to evolve to. We believe clicking is the key to selling ideas in the crowded, post information age, always on, attention deficit economy.

Here is a process you can try:
Thought leaders don’t sell, they understand. If you don't know why people might benefit from your ideas, then spend time getting to know them and ask their permission to use them as a pilot to test and prototype your offer. Initially they may not even pay you, but if it works they will tell all their contacts and mates about you. If it doesn’t, then what you will learn from this experience will be invaluable. This is thought prototyping though. Once you know their needs and can show them how you have a solution, then they invite you to dance! It’s really simple. All you need to do is:
  • Know your stuff
  • Know my stuff
  • Place your stuff as the solution to my stuff and always create massive value.
The idea that you have integrity is the price of entry. Without this, others will not buy your ideas, your approach, or you. As a consequence, thought leaders embrace this new approach, because they can evolve from selling to people, to clicking with people. Clicking is simple fun of service to the people you are communicating with and earns you the right to pitch your ideas and approach.

M@

* Extract from the book Thought Leaders, written by Matt Church, Michael Henderson and Scott Stein.

Tuesday, June 12, 2012

Think before you speak - 7 questions you can ask yourself before your next speech

Before you open your mouth to speak, there are some questions you need to develop answers for, think of this as the pre-work for any speech.

7 Great Questions

1. The context
If you could summarise your speech in one word (x), what is it about?

2. The key points
What 3, 5 or 7 points are you hoping to make about that context (x)?

3. Importance
Why is context (x) important? This is all about answering the question, why this message?

4. Urgency
Now that you have established that (x) is important, you need to make it urgent. So, why do we need to care about (x) now? Note: You will see at this point we are not discussing your points, simply the big picture context of your speech. This can normally be summarised in one word.

5. Problems (common)
What common problem/challenge or aspiration does the audience have that needs to be fixed?

6. Problems (deeper)
What deeper problem do they have to fix that your speech addresses?

7. Prescriptions
What actions can the audience take after your presentation that will make a difference with (x)? (List 3 things the audience can do immediately to make a difference around (x))

Anyone can speak to drive business, they just need to learn the formula's.

M@

Tuesday, June 5, 2012

Build a bridge for your future clients


Do your (potential) clients know why they need your expertise? A value model is a contextual diagram you can draw to explain the placement of your ideas to a potential client’s situation. It’s also nice to have a metaphor up your sleeve to go with the model. A value model is simply to answer why they need your expertise to help their known, unknown or unspoken problem, when they potentially already know how you can provide the fix.

Too often experts want to solve problems straight away. They are so into their ideas that they throw them away on ears that are either not interested or don’t know why they should be interested! A value model will help to bridge that gap.

An example of a value model is the Million Dollar Expert Income Ladder Model (below), used when partnering with infopreneurs to help them make more money sharing their thoughts. Those who have completed the Million Dollar Expert (MDE) Programs, will know this model well.
 
There are 3 key elements that need to be on a value model:
  • Currency
  • Aspiration
  • Location
1. Currency: A great value model shows a currency the partner will value. This can be money, but it could equally be time, energy, a certain feeling or some other quantifiable outcome. In the Million Dollar Expert Income Ladder Model, you see gross practice billings as an actual currency.

2. Aspiration: A great value model has a sense of a compelling future. It should show me how to take your ideas to get somewhere better. It should mobilise me in pursuit of a better future. On the Million Dollar Expert Income Ladder Model, you see that an infopreneur can move from white belt to black belt on the ladder. We also indicate a ‘sweet spot’, just above blue belt, where your referrals are creating most of your new business. It is explained that this is a result of the focus on positioning at stages 4 and 5.

3. Location: Finally, a great value model is one where you can pin-point where you are on the journey. You need to be able to locate where you are on your model. On the Million Dollar Expert Income Ladder Model, thought leaders often discuss “where I am at the moment and I would love to get to here.” When people can locate themselves on your model, you will want to simply invite them to work on progressing themselves, along with your assistance…

Yes, you still have to ask for the business!

M@